International Development

Episode 35: Community Development in Nepal with Bee Shrestha

In this episode, Caspar speaks with 25 year old community leader Bee Shrestha. Bee is the founder of a social enterprise called Guilty Pleasures, that teaches work skills and provides independent livelihood to trafficked women in Nepal. Bee also runs her own international development company and is an avid public speaker. She hosts public 'Talk Shows' in Nepal and Thailand that aim to break down taboos in social discourse, such as mental health, sex, gender and rape. Produced and edited by Nina Roxburgh with music by Big Gigantic.

 Caspar and Bee bingeing on social justice and getting it done! 

Caspar and Bee bingeing on social justice and getting it done! 

Episode 23: Queensland Politics with Amy MacMahon

In this episode Caspar gets binge thinking with 31 year old sociologist, Amy MacMahon. Amy has spent the last four years completing her PhD on adaptation initiatives in Bangladesh rolled out by NGOs and governments to combat climate change. She investigates how these initiative impact women farmers specifically and perpetuate gender inequality.

But Amy has another side. She is also running as a Greens candidate for South Brisbane in the upcoming Queensland state elections. Caspar and Amy binge on her journey to politics through her research, navigating the difficult and insecure Australian labour market, her family and her personal life. You can follow Amy on Twitter and Facebook This episode was produced by Nina Roxburgh and features music by Big Gigantic

 Caspar and Amy post binge on life, politics, environment, and welfare. 

Caspar and Amy post binge on life, politics, environment, and welfare. 

Episode 13: Countering Violent Extremism with Kavita Bedford

Binge Thinking is back with our third episode in collaboration with the Griffith Review: Millennials Strike Back. Kavita Bedford joins Caspar in the binge tank to discuss her piece ‘The Spectator: Something distant called war’. Kavita also binged on her work countering violent extremism in Western Sydney with the Mapping Frictions, and as editor of The Point Magazine. Join Caspar and Kavita as they go on a deep dive, remembering where they were that fateful day, when the war of our generation began. Produced by Nina Roxburgh with Music by Big Gigantic.

 Kavita Bedford joins Caspar on an interstate binge discussing her piece   
  
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  ‘The Spectator: Something distant called war’ featured in the  Griffith Review: Millennials Strike Back

Kavita Bedford joins Caspar on an interstate binge discussing her piece ‘The Spectator: Something distant called war’ featured in the Griffith Review: Millennials Strike Back

This episode is part of a special Binge Thinking series in collaboration with the Brisbane-based literary journal Griffith Review. Their Millennials Strike Back edition was co-edited by Jerath Head features 32 stories from millennial authors on a diverse range of topics. You can find it at Australian bookstores or online at their website.

Griffith Review on Twitter: @GriffithReview

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Griffith Review Website

Griffith Review 56: Millennials Strike Back